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SPINDLES September 28, 2015

Posted by sailingnightwatch in Durbeck, FL, Florida, ICW, Pensacola, Repairs, Restoration, Sailing, Sailing the ICW.
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I may have mentioned that there are 15 spindles surrounding our aft deck. That is where we have been for the last week. Using a heat gun to remove the old varnish then sand it with 80 and 120 grit sand paper. Then it is washed the day before the first coat of varnish and then wiped down with acetone the morning you start. Tomorrow I start the varnishing. I put on 3 coats of varnish then seven coats of Bristol. That is a two part acrylic type of clear coat. I swore I would never use it again, but here I go. I ran out after three coats of Bristol on the cockpit cap rail. I have been waiting for the boat to come in. It is suppose to be here next Monday. That will give me plenty of time to put down the varnish coats.

Once this is finished, I only have the cap rail that goes around the main deck to do. That is fairly easy, normally. I have always been able to do it from a pier. This time I will have to lay over the rail to reach the outside of the rail. I usually have to visit a chiropractor after this. We will see.

I am still giving it some thought as to whether I should do the cap rail at all. Sitting here I can think it really does not need it. Then in the bright sun, I know it looks terrible and needs to be done.

On the social side, we had 7 friends over for heavy hor’ederves and bring your own poison. I have no idea how you spell that and neither does spell check. You know what I mean. Little meat balls, dips, ham and cheese rolled up. That kind of stuff. We had a lot of fun. One of our guest has left for Trinidad and then they are going back to the USVI to pick up his meds and get checked over. He had open heart surgery about 8 years ago and still gets checked up. After he gets checked up they are off to the Sand Blast Islands near Panama. They have been there before and think it is the best. They have been out here 6-7 years. Real Cruisers.

Have I mentioned how warm it has been. The last couple weeks there has been a tropical storm Ida drifting around north of the Caribbean. It has shut off the trade winds. What normally plows 15-20 knots is now blowing 5-10 knots. Not enough to keep the boat cool. The water is probably in the mid 80’s. You jump in then get out and stand in the wind to cool down. Repeat as needed.

We have dinghy drifts on the night of the full moon. Well last night there was an eclipse, blood moon, harvest noon, and some other things that will not happen again till 2033. I doubt I need to worry about that one.

Time for bed. After finishing sanding this morning, I filled the aft fuel tank. I carry the fuel from the marina to the anchored boat in 5 gallon jerry cans. I have been doing this since I got bad fuel in the Bahamas. I use a filter to make sure there is no water or junk in the fuel. Tomorrow after varnishing I will fill the forward tank. I put 30 gallons in the aft tank and need about 20 gallons in the forward tank. I am getting old for throwing around those jerry cans. Knock on wood, I have not had fuel problems now for about a year and a half. Having your engine stop due to bad fuel when you need your engine is not fun. It took quite a bit of rough sailing before I had problems when going into an anchorage in Puerto Rico. Clogged up filters and burned up fuel pump. About 3 hours of hot messy work before I got it going again. I do change fuel filters a lot more often then I used to. I also drain the water separator at the same time.

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Comments»

1. Jane Bernard - September 28, 2015

Your love for and tender loving care of fhe HM Nightwatch shows in all the pics and more beautiful no doubt in person! Take care and not too much talk of old. – alarms me.

sailingnightwatch - October 26, 2015

HM is for Her Majesty. Nightwatch is a US documented vessel. She is SV or S/V for sailing vessel. A US naval vessel is USS for United States Ship. Bernie you need to buy her a copy of Duttons. All about what makes a yacht a yacht.


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