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TIME TO MOVE ON August 3, 2015

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This was a good week. Got the scratches repaired by a fellow cruiser from South Africa. From what I can ascertain he was a powder coater. They have a different name for the process, but he explained what it was and how it worked and powder coating was it. To keep his cruising kitty full, he does repair work. He did my scratches in less then 2 hours and half way through you could not find any sign of them. He is also a licensed captain for 100 ton vessels and does yacht deliveries where ever in the world. Cool guy.

His lady is Miss Kitty. Think “Gun Smoke” She is from the Grapevine Texas area and lived just a short ways from my brother and sister-in-law. She can lay on the draw like you would not believe…, darling. Neat couple. Been cruising together for 10 years. Each has a boat, hers is here and I think his is in Europe. Makes it easy if they deliver across the pond. Just get on his boat and cruise there until a job comes this way.

The mate’s back is better, but she is being very careful about what she does.

Went to a going away party for Canadian friends who sold there boat and are going back to their home in the Canadian Rockies. There to buy a motor home and visit all the provinces of Canada and all the states in the US. Then maybe get another boat. They are in their fifties, maybe 60, both have more energy then I ever had. They do a lot of hiking. There maybe something to be said for that.

Wednesday we head for Trinidad. Going there for a haul out which is when they put the boat up on jack stands and repaint the bottom and do other maintenance and upgrades. We have a wish list that will never get done. The bottom will be repainted. That is really needed. We are going to get a winch for the davits. We store the dinghy in the davits with the outboard on. Dinghy, outboard and gas weigh around 300 pounds. It is a lot to lift even with a 3 fold tackle on the motor side. I have some ideas and the people at the yard say they have built several different types. We will see. Money will determine this one. We also want to reupholster the settees and stools in the main saloon. They are about 15 years old and are getting threat bare. They really held up good and are still very confortable. Again dollars. We would like to get a new set of skins for the dinghy. Those are Sunbrella covers that protect the dinghy. Your dinghy is like your car, pickup truck and bus. It takes a lot of beating. It is used almost every day and not treated very gently. It gets tied up to docks that have rough services, various marine growth and various nails, screws etc. to tear up your family car. Again its dollars. Trinidad has a reputation for doing excellent work for a reasonable price. I should know about the reasonableness by next Monday. That is when they will haul the boat and start work. It will be interesting. Prices are negotiated and it will be done between English and Spanish. My Spanish is like my French. I can be polite and that is about it. Pray for us, we will need it on this adventure.

TRINIDAD WEATHER WINDOW July 27, 2015

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Yep, looking for a weather window again. They seem to come around the end of the week. That would put us into Trinidad on a on a weekend. That usually means paying an overtime fee for Customs and Immigration. Just another tax. I hate taxes, of any kind and for any reason. Now there is a need for taxes, but overtime and the workers do not get any higher rate of pay. I do not need to pay more to anyone’s coffers.

A week from today, August 3rd looks like the middle of a period of mild weather. Trinidad is about 90 miles away so we will leave late Monday afternoon and hope to arrive early to mid morning on Tuesday. No overtime pay. We will be there till about the 17th and then head back to Grenada.

Last week I mentioned that it had rained like I had not seen since last summer. That was true. There was little wind and a lot of rain. This Saturday, a tropical wave was passing over us. It blew well into the mid to high 30’s for most of the morning. There would be a squall line and then a break and then another squall line. The weather comes from the east with the trade winds. I am anchored towards the east shore. The idea is to get some protection. I do not think it is working. The winds swirl around the hills and hit you from north to south with good ferocity.

While anchored here, there is only one boat between me and Venezuela. Don’t get ahead of me here. One of the really strong squall lines is moving through and I am up in the cockpit keeping watch and turning on the anchor alarm in the chart plotter. I look at this one boat, a 43 foot catamaran and he is swinging more then normal but he is where he is suppose to be. I turn back to do some final adjustments to my alarm and look up and see the cat turning sideways and head for me with a lot of speed. When you think about a catamaran, they have a lot of windage. It was happening so fast that all I could do was blow my air horn. He was standing in his cabin because he does not have a windshield. The rain just blows in between his cabin top and the bimini. Kind of like driving down the road forty miles per hour in a rain storm and hanging your head out the window.

So he is blowing down on me and I go out on deck, yea its raining, to see what I can do. I do not have time to get a fender ready because they are tied down ready to go to sea. One does not stick arms between 30 to 40 tons of boats wishing to play bumper car. So you stand there and listen to the heavy thud and bang and screeching of fiberglass. Don, the owner of the other boat gets his engines going and pulls away after he is about ½ way down the side of my boat. I saw a couple scratches but decided to wait till the afternoon when the storm had passed.

We looked and I have 2 heavy scratches and some smaller ones. He came out with scuffmarks on his starboard bow and a stanchion that was broke loose. Not bad considering the noise. Today I had one of the marine service companies come and look at it and he is getting a couple fiberglass workers to come and take a look tomorrow. I need to get them patched before heading off to Trinidad. Otherwise water will get into the fiberglass and that is just asking for trouble.

That is most of the excitement for the past week. I did get the outboard serviced. It runs very nicely now.

Other news, the mate hurt her back, was making her way forward as the rain was just starting. She was bring me a rain jacket while I was taking down the awing. She ducked under one of the poles that hold the awing up and turned at the same time. Next thing I hear is a scream and she is bent over saying she can’t stand up. Well I help her back to the cockpit which she now has to climb into. From the deck the combing is a little over knee high. I got her to sit down on the combing and lifted her legs over and onto the seat. From there we lifted her down to the seat where she could stand up and move towards the hatch and latter. Yes there is a lot of hollering, but she managed to keep it civil.

The hatch has a combing about 10 inches above the deck. I lifted her feet over the combing and onto the first step of the ladder. There are 6 steps on the ladder I led her down hoping she did not fall on me. That would not have been a pretty sight. Got her to one of the settees where she spent the majority of the next two days. Sunday was a little better and today she was almost back to normal. And most people think we are out here sunning ourselves on the beaches and deck. I have not laid on the deck since the Bahamas. Have not been to a beach in 6 months. Most of the sailing has been more harrowing then pleasurable. But it is beautiful in paradise.

THREE DAY FROM HELL July 14, 2015

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I do not know or am checking, but I think I used that title before. If I do not search, I do not know if it was better or worse. What happened these days were worse. We will leave it at that. Friday we were in Carriacou. Had a most wonderful dinner with friends at the Vogle Round House. The owner and chief was chief on The Christina, Onasis’s yacht. I think all great chiefs know how to make the world’s greatest sauces. This lady does. We have eaten their before with friends and brag about there food to all cruisers we encounter. It was a fantastic dinner.

When she was serving us our cocktails on the lawn overlooking the bay, she said she was closing for 3 years to return to England and show and school her 2 kid in England. They do not know their relatives and hardly their grandparents. They own the restaurant and a few cottages that they rent out on the property. She assureds me they would not start a restaurant in England, (she is a little burned out), and would not sell this place. I do not think we will ever go there again, but if she does reopen, I hope all cruisers in the area will go.

So much for the good life. Saturday we left for Grenada. We ran to keep a head of rain squalls from Carriacou to Grenada. The normal rough north side of the island was not real bad. Wahoo. We got about 1/3 down the island and the flooding alarm went off. It is an old Cadillac car horn. It would let the neighborhood know there is a problem. I went below, checked the engine room and all was tight and secure. There was a lot of water under the environmental pan under the engine. Not good. I next went to the stuffing box. That is the mechanism the keeps the water from coming into the boat through the prop shaft. The stuffing in it had worn out. Without going into details My buddy boat and I ( he anchored beside us and came over with some special tools and helped replace the stuffing). 3-4 hours later we were under way. I have put about 4 hours on the new stuffing and about have the adjustment about right to keep the right amount of water dripping into the boat. So much for day one.

We did not go as far as expected on day one because of the problem. We therefore anchored at St George for the night.. The next morning we dinghy around the port and look at the city and marinas. It is a one of the prettiest capital towns in the islands. After the tour we headed off to Hog Island. We headed south and rounded the island and headed about 5 miles east to the island. On rounded the island, we encountered 25-30 knot wind and seas up to 6 foot. Got down to 1.9 knots and put up the staysail with a twist into it. That gave us an additional 1-2 knots. That was great through the seas and we entered Hog Island. The place was very full. We found a place to anchor, but I was not confortable with our room to swing. Our buddy boat could not find a place at all. We hauled anchor and headed back west to Mt Hartman Bay to find an anchorage. Our boat buddies found a place near the entrance and we found one near the mooring field to squeeze into. It was not long before we were informed we were to close to the mooring field. Well, I am sorry, but it was cocktail time and I am not moving. The next morning we moved.

Day 3. We found a place near our cruising buddy and anchored. We put out about 150 foot of chain. Almost right for the depth. Our cruising buddy called and said there was a catamaran dragging anchor and moving towards them. I jumped into the dinghy and picked him up and headed for the drifting boat. While I was coming, he put out a general call to help. We got on the boat and the owners were ashore.   They had put down next to no scope for there anchor. The anchor windlass was on and had tons of chain. We put out maybe 40 additional feet and it started to hook up. By that time we were coming up to another steel anchored boat. The 2 of us fended off as much as possible. About that time 4 other people showed up to help get the boat re-anchored. We finally got it secured and left the boat. A little latter the owners were towed back to there boat. They got on board, hoisted there dinghy and raised their anchor. They went right back to the same place and put out about the same amount of chain. Guess what. They went below and the boat was dragging again. About 5 minutes later, they came on deck and proceeded to lounge in the cockpit, while the boat was dragging down wind. One of the guys went forward and proceeded to rig a bridle for his anchor chain. That will not help you hold to the bottom. He finally figured that out. Ready for this, they raised the anchor and decided to anchor closer to shore. They even used less chain to anchor and guess what, they started to drag again. As they are drifting by, they started putting out fenders. I could not figure if they were expecting to drift into other boats of go to the marina. Thank goodness, they went to the marina. I could only figure out they had never anchored or they stole the boat last night and never did anything.

That was 3, right? Well last night we went to the marina for happy hour. What a surprise.   About 25 of the people that were here last year have returned. We took most of the tables in the placed and put them together. Then there was an additional annex that we could not fit on the end. It was great seeing those that we have seen up and down the chain and those we have not seen since last summer. That included people we would meet on the shopping bus or meet at the bar with other acquaintances. A good time. While enjoying the evening, there were a couple squalls roll by. We were anchored quite a ways from the marina and I did walk out to check on old Nightwatch. All was well.

We returned to the boat about a half hour before the real squalls hit. From 9 – 10:30 it stormed. About 10 it got rough. I went out and set an anchor watch on the chart plotter. It went off in about 10 minutes. There was the wind coming several directions around the hills and the currents coming from several other directions. That makes all the boats do a dose do. Not good. Because of the scope everyone is using we could actually do 360 degree circles and miss one another…, usually.. I watch us do 2 clockwise and 1 counter clockwise. I would like to go out deep enough and let all the chain out to unwind. I am afraid I could not pull the anchor back up. Have to get more guts. Enough for one week.

THE PLAN July 7, 2015

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Tomorrow, Wednesday we are off at between 8 and 9 am. That is the plan. We will be off to Tobago Cays. Finally. I hope. Wind is suppose to lay down and the seas. About everyone we know have left in the past week. The mate has us making Tobago Cays tomorrow and leaving Thursday to check out at Union island and into Carriacau. Then Friday on to Grenada. That gives us tomorrow afternoon and Thursday morning to snorkel plus a spare day in this weather window. Gee, that is planning 5 day on a weather forecast. OK. The mate does the navigating….

Other then that we have been here in Bequia doing laundry, shopping, eating. The Forth party had about 30 cruisers from the US, France, England and at least one other country that I could not pronounce their names and never figured out where they were from. Some place in Eastern Europe, I think. Nice couple. He spoke some English, she none. Same with one French couple. HE spoke some English, she understood some. Enough to play Yatziee and beat everyone by double. Lots of fun.

Hopefully we will start to be on schedule to Trinidad based on our wants and not the weather windows that have been few and far between since November. We will see. The weather windows have been 1 – 2 day duration at best, then sit for a week to up to 5 weeks an not be able to move.

The mate, who oversees our water, has us up to 200 gallons, the most since November. We were over 150 once and gave away about 70 gallons to friends that needed water. The water maker has been a blessing. Along with the wind generator and solar panels to provide the electricity to run it.

The last 2 weeks have been windy and squally and we have lived off the wind generator. Rainy cloudy weather does not get you much through the solar panels. The wind the last 2 weeks has been in the 20’s plus periods in the 30’s. Two nights ago it was in the 40’s for a few hours. The wind generator over heats at those speeds and goes into a free wheel mode. It then sounds like a WWII fighter in a dog fight as it revs up and down with the wind. And all that time not producing electricity. Just noise and hits vibrations levels from not being perfectly balanced that tries to shake the mizzen mast apart. The mate moved to the saloon to sleep because of the noise, only to be met by the staysail and genoae sheets slapping the deck in the wind.

Well, I will try to get this off on WiFi. The last one I did on Thursday, I had WiFi at 11:30 PM. Amazing. Well it is about that time and plus, almost all the kids are gone. That frees up the internet.

They sail in a group. This time there were about 10 of them and they all left with in a day or two. They are all home schooled and spend a lot of time on the internet during the morning for school and then when the weather is bad the rest of the time. Makes it hard to get on line.

Almost all of them study from around 8 AM till noon 5 days a week all year long. They are an amazing group of well educated, well behaved, responsible kids. They range in age of pre-collage to about 4. One 4 Y.O. has better radio procedures then any military operator I have ever heard. They socialize as a pack. Have seen as many as 30 of them together in Grenada. Age does not matter much. The 3-4 year olds can out swim you, a little older and can out handle the largest of boats. Pre teens normally are standing watches when sailing. When talking with them they speak and act as adults, even the young ones.

They are a lesson for adults about education and giving responsibility. Because of this they are actually recruited by the best universities. Anyone afraid of taking there kids cruising just has to look to the kids that are out there. The parents have to take on the home schooling tasks, which is a challenge. The adults must accept that they are learning from a constant changing environment. And accept that they are their to take on the responsibility when needed. Even the youngest. I am amazed.

GUESS WHERE WE ARE AT! July 2, 2015

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Today was the best day in a week. About 8 boats left for going south. Still rough and the mate really does not want to go out there. So we and are 2 boat buddies sit.

Yesterday on the beach we celebrated Canada Day. It is like their 4th. Met a lot of new people and had a lot of fun. We are going to do the 4th at one of the bar/restaurants that are along the bay. Tomorrow we will know what they can put together. There are more US boats here then I have seen in one place in a long time. It could be a good party.

The weather was to get better and today and tomorrow are the best this week. Tomorrow would be tolerable, but we would be stuck in another bay with a lot of expensive restaurants. Can not do expensive eating out very often. We try to limit meals out to lunches. Unless of course, it is a special place. There are some as we move up and down the island chain.

We could have gone today, but our friends that went said it was getting rough within about 3 miles of the destination. We want to go to Tobago Cays for at least one day and do some snorkeling.

We have been stormed out the last two times we were there. Next week looks like it might finally calm down for several day so we can spend some time Tobago Cays and still have time to move on to Union Island and check out of the Grenadines. Then we go and check in to Carriacou, which is the sister island of Grenada. There is a great restaurant there and we will do dinner with friends.

It is Thursday and I am just writing this. Getting WiFi out of here is a real problem. The other day I went and tried to pay for some stuff with a credit card and the credit card systems were down. So was the WiFi for the island. Could be some linkage there, you think?

I will try tomorrow to transmit this while the mate is picking up a couple items we forgot at the grocery store today. It was fine that we forgot them, I could not have carried any more. Retired male cruisers are know as pack animals. That is only the beginning of the fun. You get loaded up with an overstuffed book back pack, tote a cart behind you, and trudge off to the dinghy. There you transfer all to the dinghy and speed off to the boat. The 3 weeks of wind keep about a 1.5 foot chop in the bay. Now we tie the dinghy to the boat and hang on for dear life with one had and transfer everything onto the deck of the mother ship. Hopefully the light stuff does not blow off the deck while we were getting onboard. Transfer the stuff from the deck to the cockpit and then below to be put away.

Wish me luck with the technology gods of the islands and y’all have a great 4th.

WE MOVED ON June 29, 2015

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We moved on to Bequia, past St Vincent. It is a very pretty island. We never stop at St Vincent because of the terrible reputation it has for robbing and worse things to cruisers. Granted they have a couple years of no problem, but the government and all is still very suspect. If I want to tour the island, and I would like to, I would take a ferry from Bequia and a bus tour of the island. That way one is relatively safe. Oh, the weather…, on the north side, 6-7 plus and the occasional 8 footer. Makes the mate want to matinee.

So we are here expecting to be here for a week and have a weather window. No such luck. We want a day or two at the Tabago Cays to do some snorkeling in one of the best places in the world. We have been there twice. The first time the mate thought she was drowning, the second time we got there 2 minutes before a good 2 day storm. When we got up everyone was leaving. We left, do not want to be the last one out of town.

Still have not done some good snorkeling. Want to this time. We are also below the named storm box that does away with out insurance. We are about 10 miles north at this time. Yes we would make a run for it. We would go to South America to avoid hurricanes.

This week we have toured the island of Bequia with the group of boat buddies we are traveling with. They have not been here so it has been fun showing them the Turtle Sanctuary, and the fishing area on the Atlantic side, among other places. See our Facebook page.

Our next weather window, which was to be Tuesday is now Friday. It is also 1 day long. We want to do Tobago Cays and that takes at least 2 days. What will be will be. We have one more shot at it next fall. Yes we are pretty sure about coming back to the States next year. Of course there is the election. We could become expatriates. Sail on forever.

Only I would do that. The mate would see me kicked over the side first. She may have done that already if she could figure out how to get the boat back to sell. She reminds me that this is her home also. I may be safe. Seriously, if you recall she signed on for a one year tour. We are into year 2 year, and thing are the same. She is scared to death in heavy seas, but loves the islands between. I love the islands between, and work through the heavy seas and yes are somewhat fearful. One should be.

We will spend some time in Grenada and then go to Trinidad for a bottom job. Our bottom jobs have lasted us 3 years in the states. They have been in poorer shape as haul outs have been scheduled. This last coat lasted a little over a year. We have to scrub the bottom every couple of weeks. The preventive is gone. Thank you EPA. Practical Sailor Magazine says there last test, none worked. Suggested using Sears house paint. Would work as well. Thank you EPA. We cruisers are not killing the seas. Look at the shipping industry, fishing industry and the navies of the world that never have things growing on there bottoms. I do not have enough money of political presents to make a difference. Lets see, 35’ x 13.5 x .3 versus a 800 x 80 x 40 foot container ship or a cruise ship of 1000 feet or the navies of the world. Yea we boaters are killing the seas. What about the mound of plastic containers that is the size of states, floating around the Pacific.

See what happens when one is stuck in the same place for a period of time. We get a little WE MOVED ON

We moved on to Bequia, past St Vincent. It is a very pretty island. We never stop at St Vincent because of the terrible reputation it has for robbing and worse things to cruisers. Granted they have a couple years of no problem, but the government and all is still very suspect. If I want to tour the island, and I would like to, I would take a ferry from Bequia and a bus tour of the island. That way one is relatively safe. Oh, the weather…, on the north side, 6-7 plus and the occasional 8 footer. Makes the mate want to matinee.

So we are here expecting to be here for a week and have a weather window. No such luck. We want a day or two at the Tabago Cays to do some snorkeling in one of the best places in the world. We have been there twice. The first time the mate thought she was drowning, the second time we got there 2 minutes before a good 2 day storm. When we got up everyone was leaving. We left, do not want to be the last one out of town.

Still have not done some good snorkeling. Want to this time. We are also below the named storm box that does away with out insurance. We are about 10 miles north at this time. Yes we would make a run for it. We would go to South America to avoid hurricanes.

This week we have toured the island of Bequia with the group of boat buddies we are traveling with. They have not been here so it has been fun showing them the Turtle Sanctuary, and the fishing area on the Atlantic side, among other places. See our Facebook page.

Our next weather window, which was to be Tuesday is now Friday. It is also 1 day long. We want to do Tobago Cays and that takes at least 2 days. What will be will be. We have one more shot at it next fall. Yes we are pretty sure about coming back to the States next year. Of course there is the election. We could become expatriates. Sail on forever.

Only I would do that. The mate would see me kicked over the side first. She may have done that already if she could figure out how to get the boat back to sell. She reminds me that this is her home also. I may be safe. Seriously, if you recall she signed on for a one year tour. We are into year 2 year, and thing are the same. She is scared to death in heavy seas, but loves the islands between. I love the islands between, and work through the heavy seas and yes are somewhat fearful. One should be.

We will spend some time in Grenada and then go to Trinidad for a bottom job. Our bottom jobs have lasted us 3 years in the states. They have been in poorer shape as haul outs have been scheduled. This last coat lasted a little over a year. We have to scrub the bottom every couple of weeks. The preventive is gone. Thank you EPA. Practical Sailor Magazine says there last test, none worked. Suggested using Sears house paint. Would work as well. Thank you EPA. We cruisers are not killing the seas. Look at the shipping industry, fishing industry and the navies of the world that never have things growing on there bottoms. I do not have enough money of political presents to make a difference. Lets see, 35’ x 13.5 x .3 versus a 800 x 80 x 40 foot container ship or a cruise ship of 1000 feet or the navies of the world. Yea we boaters are killing the seas. What about the mound of plastic containers that is the size of states, floating around the Pacific.

See what happens when one is stuck in the same place for a period of time. We get a little hostile. Oh well. I am 5 days late unless I can get this out tonight. That would be good.

Lets see, I am to do the next installment in 2 days. Never can tell, I may mellow by then. Naaaa. That is why they call us old geezers.

STILL HERE AGAIN June 15, 2015

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It is Monday again and we are still in Rodney Bay. The plan of the day is to go further south on St Lucia and stage for going to St Vincent.

We have always avoided St Vincent because it has a bad reputation. We have some boat friends that have gone there several times. Always traveling in a group. Going there would cut the trip into a 35 and a 15 mile leg. Everyone likes that. St Vincent makes me nervous. There are many robberies there and have been murders of cruisers. The country is very corrupt and as long as people are paid off, you can get away with anything. I do not need that

We took a tour of the island that included several fishing villages, the Pitons, a good lunch, a botanical garden, a waterfall and a few stops where you get accosted by people selling beads, baskets etc. They get pretty aggressive and follow you around. You can tell them “no” many times. Rejection does not bother them. And this is an English speaking island. Oh well. The tour was nice.

Saturday we hiked up to a fort that dated back to the 1770’s. Not a bad hike. After the hike we had a nice leisurely lunch at the restaurant on the grounds. Sunday was back to boat projects and today grocery shopping.

It is time to be move on.

ALMOST WORKED June 15, 2015

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  • We did go through Martinique almost. Of course there were the bakeries. Then on the south end there was a good restaurant for a good dinner. But we were waiting for another weather window for a few days. One can not just sit on the boat and do nothing but boat projects.
  • We finally got out to Pitite Anse on the 6th. This is a nice bay on the south end of Martinique. We staged there ready to go to Rodney Bay. St Lucia. We left the next morning and motor sailed very early to avoid the later day winds. Left at 0415 and arrived at 0900. That was good. We had mid teens winds and 5 foot seas. Nothing big until we got to the north end of St Lucia. Then the occasional 6 footers got to be the norm. We were able to ride the current to the west and keep the swells a little forward of the beam. That kept the heavy rolls away. We did hit 30 degrees a few times and that did not make the mate happy at all. I felt it was very controlled and beat the hell out of 40 degrees.
  • We have noticed that it is getting warmer as we move south. Even at sun up it was 80 degrees and quite humid.
  • Rodney Bay is one of those places you can get things fixed. The anchor windlass started working after the second cleaning of contacts. Wahoo. The water proof connection for the remote control seams not to be that water proof. We now only leave the controller out when we are using it. Then it gets brought inside.
  • The plan was to spend half a day in Rodney Bay, do the shopping and head south to stage for the long trip to Bequia, 55 miles. The best plans and all that stuff. The immigration lady had a doctors appointment and did not come to work till after lunch. That is 1:30. To late to stage for the run to Bequia. So now we are stuck here for a week and a half waiting for a tropical wave and another weather system that was giving 30 knot winds with squalls to 40 knots and 10 foot seas. We do not do 7 foot seas if we know about them. They are scary enough. 10 footers would do me in. First it was going to be Monday we could go stage for the run. Now maybe Thursday with 6 foot seas. That means there could be some 7 footers out there. They say if you can not handle 30 knots of wind and 6 footers you should not be in the Windward. And here we are in our second year. It was not good last year, but it was not this consistently bad. We were able to sail most of the time from the Leeward south. This year we have had to motor sail almost all the time.
  • We are starting to discuss coming back to the States after this hurricane season. We will see. We are to young to sit and wait for the grim reaper. We sail, that’s what we do. We do not like to sit at anchor very long. What does that next island look like?
  • No Wifi again. Have to go to a bar or ice cream shop for internet. Eating ice cream is a nice change to beer for using the internet. Neither help the waist line, but ice cream is good. Especially with 2 dozen different flavors.

MOVING SOUTH June 1, 2015

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We left Les Saints for Portsmouth, Dominica to end up for another week waiting for weather. We did take a tour to the north east side of the island and up a river. The last was used in the second Pirates of the Caribbean movie series. Some stuff still there. See Facebook. Today, Monday we finally moved to the south end of the island to stage for our move to Martinique. We will not even go ashore here, just work on the new (3 months old) anchor windless, that died this morning. I believe it is an electrical problem. Quick check showed all ok. Still did not run. Have to check the electrical and jerk on the wires while testing them. Have to be patient looking for those electrical gremlins.

Did to much touring and eating out. Have to let the kitty build up some. We will run through Martinique and spend some time in the bays on the south end and then off to Rodney, Bay St Lucia. Will spend the money on repair items. Good marine store and the best hardware store in the WORLD. That’s saying something.

We have Wifi. This is going now.

TOURING NEVIS May 19, 2015

Posted by sailingnightwatch in Carabbean, Durbeck, FL, Florida, ICW, Pensacola, Repairs, Restoration, Sailing, Sailing the ICW.
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My touring of Nevis last year, was a trip to get my propane tank filled at the south end of the island. About a 5 minute cab trip. I also went to the gas station in town, to get dinghy gas. That was a total rip-off. The propane was ridiculously expensive, the gas was worse and the cab ride was the most expensive since NYC. This time we were smarter and propane prices are rock bottom low. The cab we had used to take us on a tour so on the way back, we worked a deal. We got the price down from last year, and Stan a boat buddy from Pensacola also needed propane, so we split the cab fare. Made the price of a bottle of propane almost normal.

We did two tours, one by cab and one by bus. We started with the cab. This was to a sugar plantation that has been restored and turned into a boutique resort. Great restaurant. Reasonable and great food. That is hard to beat in the islands. The grounds were beautiful. There was a swimming pool we could use, but it was overcast and windy. To cold for us tropical types. Wind and water around 80 degrees.

The next day we went to a botanical garden by bus. The ride there was good. They detoured and took us to the gate. The trip back was a little more arduous. We had to walk about a ¾ a mile, mostly up hill. Hill in these volcanic island are serious. We 2 old geezers made the walk and got the bus back to town without any heat attacks. For pictures see my Facebook page.

Weather window happened on Friday and we sailed to Montserrat for the night. From there we sailed on to Deshaies, Guadeloupe. The trip to Montserrat was not what was forecast. 20-25 kts on the nose with 4-5 foot lumpy seas also on the nose. Made for a super slow trip. I was one very unhappy camper by the time we got anchored. I had all kinds of excuses, but the biggest mistake was not sailing the boat right. I did not get the main ready to set, and when I needed it, it was so rough, I was not going out on deck to set it. Therefore, no speed.

The trip to Guadeloupe was almost a perfect sail. 3-4 foot seas and wind around 16 knots. Started out about 0630 on a tight reach. Around noon the wind picked up to high teens and back to a point we had a broad reach. Great sailing. Got anchored with a smile.

Time for a great bakery and more tours. Next week. See Facebook

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